"In a study published on Friday in the journal Science Advances, an international team of researchers has shown that the bacteria living in the digestive tracts of previously uncontacted hunter-gatherers discovered in Venezuela are the most diverse ever found in any human group."

"The result supports what many scientists have long suspected: that modern living has cleaved away large segments of the bacterial population, called the human microbiome, that once lived with and within our ancestors. A better understanding of that deficit could explain and potentially help prevent a host of chronic diseases that are common in Western society, including obesity, asthma, allergies and diabetes."

"Such disorders 'may be related to a degraded microbiome,' said Maria Dominguez-Bello, a researcher at the New York University School of Medicine, who led the study."

"The finding is further bolstered by a separate study released this week that compared the gut bacteria of North Americans with two groups of rural Papua New Guineans."

From +The Globe and Mail: http://ow.ly/LLfJg

How the guts of remote Amazon dwellers are different than ours
Study supports what many scientists have long suspected: that modern living has cleaved away large segments of the bacterial population that once lived with and within our ancestors

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