BIO’s David Thomas and Chad Wessel have put some much-needed light onto the trends of biotech investors over the past decade with a new report (http://bio.org/biovcstudy).

Bruce Booth highlights the key points of this report, in a Forbes article (http://ow.ly/IP92z), as follows:

"First, over the past decade, nearly 80% of venture capital for therapeutics went toward “novel drug R&D” rather than improvements on existing drugs."

"Second, initial rounds of funding (Series As) for novel drug R&D reached their highest levels in a decade in 2013."

"Third, most of the Series A funding of new startups has gone toward early stage assets (drug discovery, preclinical, and Phase 1), and this has increased over the past five years."

"Fourth, these data highlight that the pace of startup creation hasn’t changed in the past five years."

You can read the Forbes article to get more details regarding each of the points highlighted or read the report itself to get more detailed information.

From +Forbes: http://ow.ly/IP92z 

Where Does All That Biotech Venture Capital Go?
Venture capital investing in biotech has long been hard to disaggregate: how much goes to “early stage” vs “late stage”, how much goes to CNS vs oncology, discovery vs Phase 3, etc… Today BIO’s David Thomas and Chad Wessel have put some much-needed light onto the biotech investor trends over the […]

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